Our varying interpretations of Shanghai’s streets

Little Emperor Squared 2010-2 (1)

I first met the artist Shannon Lee in a dreary Starbucks in a nondescript office building, taking a small break from our day-jobs as mild-mannered corporate executives (him, not me). He had seen my website and wanted to paint a few street scenes, and in general, photograph more of Shanghai’s old neighborhoods so as to interpret them through mediums he is most well-versed in: oils, pastels and charcoal.

What you see above is one of his pastels, something he had “put together quickly” as a response to one of my photographs. But I’ve too enjoyed many of his interpretations of his own photos and general explorations of the city and its people. I’ve also had the pleasure of going on a couple of photo walks with Shannon, each of us documenting our encounters differently, him on canvas and me via film.

I am constantly humbled by the people I’ve met, and in some cases, even collaborated with, through my photography and this blog. They include other photographers who have captured Shanghai’s streets so more brilliantly (whom you can read more about in Behind the Camera Interviews), intrepid writers (like Adam over at Shanghai Scrap) and artists of various mediums. I am not only inspired by their talent but their generosity (especially the multi-talented Katya, who is responsible for making this site available to readers in China), and for that, I thank all of you for your time and friendship.

This is not as obscure and random a post as you might think. I simply wanted to take the opportunity to thank you, the reader, for your attention and share with you the pool of talent telling stories through their mediums, each of us sharing a unique interpretation of Shanghai.

With that, the blog roll (on the right) is up and expanded. Cheers.

Shanghai beach 2010-1 (1)

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1 Comment

  • Reply September 26, 2010

    Keith

    And thank YOU, for such an informative and entertaining website. Progress is important; but it is equally important, in a different way, to remember where we have come from because that helps us understand why we are here. Your Shanghai Stories provide a vital link to a past which, if not documented, will be lost, discarded like some valueless artifact; but most important of all is the fact that this past was also about people who should never be allowed to feel that they lived in vain. Bravo for what you are doing. Keith.

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